Twitch will stream the ’80s arcade gaming show ‘Starcade’

If you want to get an idea of what the show is all about, keep an eye out for the exact date when the stream will begin on Shout! Factory’s Twitch channel. That’s where all the episodes will be shown and where the platform streamed its Mystery Science Theater 3000 marathon in late June. While you can easily watch some of the episodes on YouTube, the partners promise better copies than any of the blurry recordings you can find. They digitized episodes from the original master tapes to “ensure the best quality possible.”

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Source URL:http://www.engadget.com/2017/07/23/twitch-starcade-marathon/

Yes, Microsoft is still working on a ‘Halo’ TV series

AR12Gaming reached out to Microsoft to check on the project’s status, considering it’s been a while since we’ve heard anything about it. Not to mention, Microsoft has cancelled a bunch of projects within the past few years, including Xbox Entertainment Studios and Xbox Fitness. Unfortunately, the company remains as secretive as ever and has yet to reveal any juicy info about the show, such as when we’ll finally be able to watch it.

Here’s the Microsoft spokesperson’s full statement:

“Progress on the Halo Television Series continues. We want to ensure we’re doing this the right way together with a team of creative partners (Steven Spielberg and Showtime) that can help us build the best Halo series that fans expect and deserve. We have no further details to share at this time.”

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Source URL:http://www.engadget.com/2017/07/22/microsoft-halo-tv-series/

Wells Fargo accidentally leaks 50,000 clients’ records

The copious amounts of spreadsheets in the collection were apparently handed over to Gary Sinderbrand, the former financial adviser, with no confidentiality agreement. Angela A. Turiano, the lawyer who sent him the files on a CD, explained that what happened was a mistake caused by working with an outside vendor. That vendor was supposed to vet the documents as part of the court’s discovery process and ensure Sinderbrand only received a handful of emails and files related to the case. The plaintiff was also supposed to receive a protective order issued by a judge with the files, but he didn’t get one, as well.

Turiano said she asked Sinderbrand and his lawyer to return the CD. The lack of confidentiality agreement means the former adviser can legally release all the information he got, after all. If he does, it’s Wells Fargo that will be in even more trouble. According to NYT, the vendor error can be classified as a data breach that “potentially violates a bevy of state and federal consumer data privacy laws that limit the release of personally identifiable customer information to outside parties.” Considering the affected clients aren’t your Average Joes, they can more than afford to hit the bank where it hurts.

It’s unclear if Sinderbrand will comply with Turiano’s request. His lawyer said the plaintiff plans to keep the CD secure and confidential for now as they “evaluate his legal rights and responsibilities.” Either way, it was Wells Fargo’s job to keep those clients’ data under lock and key. If it can fail to protect its top customers, then what hope is there for the rest of us?

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Source URL:http://www.engadget.com/2017/07/22/wells-fargo-accidentally-leaks-client-info/

‘Westworld’ season 2 trailer reveals a park gone horribly wrong

Westworld won’t return to TV until 2018, but we’re getting a peek at what that return will entail… and things have clearly gone downhill. A new trailer for the second season reveals that the robots are rebelling against the humans who’ve treated them so harshly (really, the core of the movie that inspired the show), and there are plenty of casualties among the guests and Delos employees. Dolores, William and other bots are clearly relishing the opportunity to get back at their tormentors. While it’s going to be a frustratingly long wait for the rest of season two, HBO is at least giving us something to look forward to.

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Source URL:http://www.engadget.com/2017/07/22/westworld-season-2-trailer/

Latest ‘Star Trek: Discovery’ trailer shows more of the crew

The clip also provides a better look at Jason Isaacs’ Captain Lorca, who’s far from a squeaky-clean role model. You catch more of Michelle Yeoh, and everyone’s ‘favorite’ conman, Harry Mudd (Rainn Wilson) gets his due. The Klingons, meanwhile, appear to be itching for a fight and have some suffering of their own. Still, there are plenty of questions left. Just what has Burnham done to get humanity into trouble? What’s Lorca really up to? And of course, how is Mudd going to throw a monkey wrench into things? You’ll have to wait until September 24th to start getting answers, but the trailer might help tide you over until then.

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Source URL:http://www.engadget.com/2017/07/22/star-trek-discovery-comic-con-trailer/

Watch the full ‘Stranger Things’ season 2 trailer

At last, Netflix is offering more than minuscule teasers for Stranger Things‘ second season. The service just premiered a full-length trailer for season 2, and it sheds much more light on what to expect. It reveals just how much Will is affected by the events of the first season (hint: a lot), the spread of the Upside Down in Hawkins and a peek at Eleven’s long-expected return. And naturally, it ramps up the nostalgia factor: there’s plenty of Ghostbusters references, Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” to set the mood and even a smattering of Dragon’s Lair. It’s still too soon to say if the Stranger Things follow-up can come anywhere close to matching expectations by this point, but it’s at least promising.

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Source URL:http://www.engadget.com/2017/07/22/stranger-things-season-2-full-trailer/

Here’s what happened when that security robot drowned

That’s still unknown, although it’s safe to say Steve wasn’t bemoaning the state of politics or suffering from existential dread. It’s possible that a software glitch led to the deadly change in course, or that weather threw it off.

The dive isn’t deterring anyone involved. The property is using a replacement robot at the moment, and Steve is expected to make a recovery once he gets repairs. He may have “died,” but he’s not gone forever. MRP Realty, which deployed Steve, clearly isn’t deterred — it wants to implement more of Knightscope’s robots at other properties within 3 to 6 months. However, it’s safe to say that both MRP and Knightscope will be combing over the data from this incident to reduce the chances of another tumble.

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Source URL:http://www.engadget.com/2017/07/22/the-day-the-security-robot-died/

Watch the nostalgic trailer for Spielberg’s ‘Ready Player One’

The preview is a whirlwind tour that focuses more on the spectacle of the OASIS’ virtual world than the story, which isn’t surprising when the movie isn’t slated to premiere until March 2018. It’s big on slam-bang action scenes (such as a gigantic virtual race) more than anything else. As such, we have some unanswered questions: how closely does it hew to the tale of Wade Watts and his quest to win James Halliday’s final game? How much will it lean on spectacle versus tackling the broader concepts of the novel? It could take months before we have a better sense of that, but it’s apparent that the visual style is at least on point — it’s easy to see why people would flock to the spectacle of the OASIS given a real world devoid of adventure.

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Source URL:http://www.engadget.com/2017/07/22/ready-player-one-trailer/

UK drone rules will require you to take safety tests

The new rules come following a study highlighting the dangers of wayward drones. A smaller drone isn’t necessarily safer than its larger alternatives, for example — many of those more compact models have exposed rotors that can do a lot of damage. A drone weighing around 400 g (0.88lbs) can crack the windscreen of a helicopter, while all but the heaviest drones will have trouble cracking the windscreen of an airliner (and then only at speeds you’d expect beyond the airport). While you might not cause as much chaos as some have feared, you could still create a disaster using a compact drone.

It’s nothing new to register drones, of course, and it doesn’t appear to have dampened enthusiasm in the US. The test adds a wrinkle, though: how willing are you to buy a drone if you know you’ll have to take a quiz? The test likely won’t slow sales too much, if at all, but it could give people one more reason to pause before buying a drone on impulse. Manufacturers appear to be in favor of the new rulebook, at any rate — DJI tells the BBC that the UK is striving for a “reasonable” solution that balances safety with a recognition of the advantages that drones can bring to public life.

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Source URL:http://www.engadget.com/2017/07/22/uk-drone-rules-require-safety-tests/

ASUS ROG Zephyrus review: Gaming laptops will never be the same again

Unlike most other laptops, ASUS pushed the Zephyrus’s keyboard and trackpad all the way to its front edge. That allowed the company to place all of its high-powered hardware towards the back of the case — in particularly, the CPU and GPU — so it could all be cooled at once. It took me a while to get used to the Zephyrus’s strange keyboard orientation, and even longer to adjust to its trackpad, which sits to the right of the keys instead of below it.

The keyboard is comfortable to type on, even though the keys have a very short travel distance. Not surprisingly, it was better suited to gaming than typing. Moving around first person shooters using the WASD keys felt just as responsive as my desktop keyboard. There’s also an array of LEDs behind every key, which you can customize using an app. ASUS bundles a comfortable wrist-rest in the box, which is useful if you’re worried about repetitive stress injuries.

While the trackpad placement is a bit strange, we’ve seen similar laptops like the Razer Blade Pro place it on the right side as well. When it comes to games, I actually found it more useful than a typical trackpad, since it almost mimics the feeling of using a mouse. It’s surprisingly smooth and responsive — in many ways it felt more accurate than a standard trackpad. Obviously, it’s not something you’d use for an FPS, but it gives you a way to play slower paced games in areas where you can’t fit a gaming mouse.

ASUS ROG Zephyrus review: Gaming laptops will never be the same again

You can also transform the trackpad into a virtual numberpad by hitting the key right above it, which some gamers might appreciate for hitting hotkeys. It wasn’t as accurate as having a physical numberpad, but it felt more convenient than just relying on the standard top number row.

Display and sound

ASUS ROG Zephyrus review: Gaming laptops will never be the same again

The Zephryus’s 15.6-inch, 1080p screen doesn’t seem particularly impressive at first, especially when other gaming laptops include 4K displays these days. But its 120Hz refresh rate and support for NVIDIA’s G-Sync technology should be appealing to gamers, since it allows for smooth play no matter what framerate you’re getting. The screen shined when playing colorful, fast-paced games like Overwatch and Doom. There wasn’t any tearing at all — it’s an experience more reminiscent of a high-end gaming monitor, than a standard laptop screen.

It’s clear that ASUS wanted to focus on speed instead of pixel count, but it would have been nice to see a slightly higher resolution to take advantage of the laptop’s bountiful horsepower. 4K would have been nice, especially since the Zephyrus can actually play games at such a high resolution, but even 1,440p would have been a decent compromise. A 1080p screen feels dated, and it’ll seem even more limiting over the next few years.

While the Zephyrus’s display was bright enough for indoor gameplay, it didn’t fair as well outdoors. I appreciated its matte finish, which minimized reflections, but just don’t expect to be fragging your friends while sitting in the park.

The laptop’s speakers, which are towards the front near the keyboard, are loud, yet tinny. You wouldn’t want to use them for any serious music or movie sessions. That doesn’t matter much for games, since most people will just plug in an elaborate pair of headphones, but it’s a disappointment nonetheless.

Performance and battery life

PCMark 7 PCMark 8 (Creative Accelerated) 3DMark 11 3DMark (Sky Diver) ATTO (top reads/writes)
ASUS ROG Zephyrus (2.8GHz Intel Core i7-7700HQ, NVIDIA GTX 1080) 6,030 7,137 E20,000 / P17,017 / X7,793 31,624 3.4 GB/s / 1.64 GB/s
Alienware 15 (2.8GHz Intel Core i7-7700HQ, NVIDIA GTX 1070) 6,847 7,100 E17,041 / P16,365 20,812 2.9 GB/s / 0.9 GB/s
Alienware 13 (2.8GHz Intel Core i7-7700HQ, NVIDIA GTX 1060) 4,692 4,583 E16,703 / P12,776 24,460 1.78 GB/s / 1.04 GB/s
Razer Blade Pro 2016 (2.6GHz Intel Core i7-6700HQ, NVIDIA GTX 1080) 6,884 6,995 E18,231 / P16,346 27,034 2.75 GB/s / 1.1 GB/s
ASUS ROG Strix GL502VS (2.6GHz Intel Core i7-6700HQ , NVIDIA GTX 1070) 5,132 6,757 E15,335 / P13,985 25,976 2.14 GB/s / 1.2 GB/s
HP Spectre x360 (2016, 2.7GHz Core i7-7500U, Intel HD 620) 5,515 4,354 E2,656 / P1,720 / X444 3,743 1.76 GB/s / 579 MB/s
Lenovo Yoga 910 (2.7GHz Core i7-7500U, 8GB, Intel HD 620) 5,822 4,108

E2,927 / P1,651 / X438

3,869 1.59 GB/s / 313 MB/s
Razer Blade (Fall 2016) (2.7GHz Intel Core-i7-7500U, Intel HD 620) 5,462 3,889 E3,022 / P1,768 4,008 1.05 GB/s / 281 MB/s
Razer Blade (Fall 2016) + Razer Core (2.7GHz Intel Core-i7-7500U, NVIDIA GTX 1080) 5,415 4,335 E11,513 / P11,490 16,763 1.05 GB/s / 281 MB/s
ASUS ZenBook 3 (2.7GHz Intel Core-i7-7500U, Intel HD 620) 5,448 3,911 E2,791 / P1,560 3,013 1.67 GB/s / 1.44 GB/s
HP Spectre 13 (2.5GHz Intel Core i7-6500U, Intel HD 520) 5,046 3,747 E2,790 / P1,630 / X375 3,810 1.61 GB/s / 307 MB/s
Razer Blade Stealth (2.5GHz Intel Core i7-6500U, Intel HD 520) 5,131 3,445 E2,788 / P1,599 / X426 3,442 1.5 GB/s / 307 MB/s

Under the hood, our Zephyrus review unit featured an Intel Core i7-7700HQ processor running at 2.8GHz, along with 16GB of RAM. But of course, the star of the show is NVIDIA’s GTX 1080 GPU. Just a year ago, the idea of cramming that GPU into a laptop was impressive. Now, we can do it in gaming notebooks that are slimmer than we’ve ever seen before. This isn’t a stripped down version of the GTX 1080 either, it’s still clocked at 1.5-1.7GHz and packs in 8GB of GDDR5X RAM.

But instead of focusing on getting as much performance from the video card as possible, NVIDIA’s Max-Q philosophy emphasizes peak efficiency — basically, the point where you can get the most bang for your GPU buck. Our unit also featured a 512GB M.2 SSD, which is significantly faster than the older SATA variety.

Your first impressions of the Zephyrus will depend on the type of computer you’re most used to. If you mainly dabble in ultraportables, you’ll likely be intimidated by how large it seems. But if you’re familiar with gaming laptops, it’ll seem remarkably slim. As soon as I was done marveling at what an engineering feat it is, I installed several games to test out its capabilities — and the results were impressive.

I saw around 100-110 frames per second in Overwatch with all of the graphics settings at maximum. That was particularly notable since I set the render scale to 140 percent, which made the computer process the game at a higher resolution than 1080p for a sharper image. Doom, meanwhile, hit its 200FPS cap with everything maxed at 1080p, and Hitman’s benchmark achieved a solid 100FPS.

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Source URL:http://www.engadget.com/2017/07/22/asus-rog-zephyrus-review/