Dell founder offers low-key response to Charlottesville violence

The low-key message stands in contrast to Apple chief Tim Cook’s email to staff, which specifically addressed the President’s remarks and vowed concrete action by donating to anti-racism causes. Uber offered its own modest statement (it only promised customers that it would uphold its existing guidelines and support), but it backed out of the economic advisory council months ago — Dell stuck to the manufacturing council until its disbanding.

We’ve asked Dell if it can provide additional insight for the email. However, the PC maker is already drawing flak from those who see the response as too little, too late. It came days after other tech companies made their views known, and avoids any kind of pointed criticism. Companies like Dell often have to walk a fine to please both the public (on all sides of the political spectrum) and the powers that be, but there are concerns that it’s trying too hard to be inoffensive.

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Source URL:http://www.engadget.com/2017/08/19/dell-ceo-response-to-charlottesville/

Recommended Reading: Netflix’s heroes return in ‘The Defenders’

‘The Defenders’ Is
Thrilling Superhero
Team-Up Entertainment

Mark Hughes,
Forbes

Netflix’s last Marvel series, Iron Fist, didn’t quite offer the same thrills as its previous three original series. Its fourth installment that unites all four heroes debuted today, and so far, the reviews are mostly positive. Forbes details how the streaming service returns to form with The Defenders miniseries. Even though the latest show may not be the best of the Marvel options on Netflix thus far, it’s an improvement after the disappointment of Iron Fist and shows potential for future team-ups with the foursome.

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Source URL:http://www.engadget.com/2017/08/19/recommended-reading-netflix-marvel-the-defenders/

Logitech's PowerPlay delivers no-compromise wireless gaming mice

The key to the system is its electromagnetic resonance charging technology, which sends power to the mouse without the need for any cords. The big, obvious benefit: You’ll never have to think about charging your mouse, be it by installing new batteries or plugging in a USB cable. Currently, PowerPlay works with Logitech’s G703 and G903 gaming mice, both of which feature the company’s new Lightspeed technology. Basically, that means they deliver an extremely low latency of 1ms, so you don’t have to worry about any lag. With those specs, they should be just as responsive as wired gaming mice. And in some cases, even more so, according to Logitech.

In my testing, the Powerplay charging mat worked just as advertised. It was truly strange to see my mouse’s battery life go up after several hours of browsing the web and playing games. A small LED light turns on when the mouse is being charged, but otherwise the entire system is pretty discreet. Setting it up is a cinch, too: The mat plugs into your computer over USB, and you just have to plug Logitech’s Powercore Module into the bottom of the mouse to get it ready. While you’d typically need to install a separate USB dongle for the Lightspeed mice, PowerPlay bundles all of that into the mat’s receiver.

Logitech's PowerPlay delivers no-compromise wireless gaming mice

After that, put your mouse on the pad and you’re good to go. The PowerPlay system comes with a soft cloth surface and a hard mousepad, both of which sit atop the rubbery charging surface. Since I typically use a metal mousing surface, I leaned toward the Powerplay’s hard cover. But I know plenty of gamers who would prefer the softer alternative, especially when it comes to things like strategy games.

It wasn’t long, though, before I noticed that Powerplay wasn’t a great solution for charging mice quickly. Logitech claims it would take 12 to 14 hours to charge them completely when they’re not in use (and of course, your computer has to be on the whole time). They’ll still get power when you’re using them, but it takes significantly longer to complete a charge cycle. Technically, that’s not a huge problem, since you’ll be using them on a charging surface anyway. But that could be anxiety-inducing if you’re used to taking your mouse on the go.

If that’s the sort of thing that bugs you, my recommendation is to plug a USB cable into your mouse directly just to reach that first full charge. Both the G703 and the G903 should get between 24 and 32 hours of battery life when away from the charging mat, according to Logitech.

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Source URL:http://www.engadget.com/2017/08/19/logitech-powerplay-wireless-mouse/

The three TVs that made our buyer’s guide

Engadget is the original home for technology news and reviews. Since our founding in 2004, we’ve grown from an exhaustive source for consumer tech news to a global multimedia organization covering the intersection of technology, gaming and entertainment. Today, Engadget hosts the archives and expertise of early digital publishing players like Joystiq, TUAW and gdgt, and produces the Internet’s most compelling videos, reviews, features and breaking news about the people, products and ideas shaping our world. After 13 years in the game, we’re leveraging our history to bring the future into focus.

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Source URL:http://www.engadget.com/2017/08/19/engadget-buyers-guide-tvs/

ASUS ZenFone AR review: A 'better' Tango phone doesn't mean much

Google’s vision of a future with devices that sense the world around them is a potentially game-changing one, and now one of its biggest rivals is embracing it too. Needless to say, there’s a real chance that your next phone (or maybe your next-next phone) will support augmented reality. For Tango, though, the progress has been slow. It’s been a little less than a year since the first Tango phone launched, and the number of available apps hasn’t grown much; there are around 50 now, as compared with 40 or so in 2016. Some of Tango’s functional issues haven’t been solved, either: a decent chunk of available apps still have trouble detecting surfaces and remembering where objects or markers are.

ASUS ZenFone AR review: A 'better' Tango phone doesn't mean much

Generally speaking, apps fall into three buckets: games, utilities and miscellaneous stuff. Tango games like Phantogeist, a first-person AR shooter, remain a lot of fun — I spent about an hour wandering through the office, disrupting meetings in search of foes to blast with my lightning gun. It’s perhaps the most action-packed Tango game you’ll find, but it also highlights some of the biggest challenges for developing Tango content: Enemy orbs still float through walls the phone should be able to detect, and there’s nothing to keep you coming back once that initial wave of novelty wears off. Hot Wheels Track Builder plops you into an ersatz workshop where you can tinker with elaborate racetracks and launch cars on them. Unfortunately, the bits you plop down are prone to wandering, forcing you to reset your view once in a while. That’s the thing about Tango games right now: Even the stuff that’s been out since Tango launched can feel a little unfinished.

The utilitarian apps haven’t changed much, which is fine, since they worked fairly well the first time around. You can still measure things with Google’s Measure app with some degree of accuracy, or plop virtual Wayfair furniture into the space around you to see how it all fits. Maybe the most impressive new addition comes from BMW, which lets you virtually poke around a mostly life-size i3 or i8; you can even fire up the windshield wipers. Occasional tracking issues aside (Measure sometimes offers incorrect figures because it’s harder than expected to place the first marker), these apps were generally free of major issues. That’s more important than you’d think: While the games offer a brief respite from reality, Tango’s potential to help people get things done is what will drive more people to embrace AR.

ASUS ZenFone AR review: A 'better' Tango phone doesn't mean much

Then there’s the other stuff. The best current example in the Play Store is an app from the Wall Street Journal that shows you a three-dimensional table visualizing the rises and falls of the US stock market. It works, but using it isn’t particularly intuitive, and the app offers little extra functionality; once you home in on a company, you can check its stock price and glance at a few relevant headlines. If anything, it demonstrates one of the most crucial challenges facing augmented reality developers: How do you present information in a way that makes valuable use of the “space” AR provides? With augmented reality being such a nascent technology, good answers are hard to come by.

Like the last time I tested Tango, the experience felt like a slice of the future when everything worked the way it’s supposed to. Unfortunately, the novelty of most Tango apps wears off quickly. That’s partially a sales problem — if there were more Tango phones out in the world, developers would have more of an incentive to build great experiences for it. For now, though, the Tango remains a promising platform held back by its limited appeal.

Performance and battery

ASUS ZenFone AR review: A 'better' Tango phone doesn't mean much

As mentioned, the ZenFone AR packs a Qualcomm Snapdragon 821, a chipset from last year that still packs a punch. Despite ASUS’s heavy touch with its software, the ZenFone ran smoothly whether I was launching apps or furiously multitasking in an effort to stymie the phone. In day-to-day use, you’d be hard-pressed to tell the difference between this thing and a Snapdragon 835-powered device … unless you’re a fan of visually intense games and VR content. I noticed occasional moments of lag and some visual tearing while playing high-end titles like Afterpulse, as well as when I had the ZenFone plugged into Google’s Daydream VR headset. These instances are the exception, not the rule, though, and it’s nice to finally see a Tango phone that doesn’t skimp on the horsepower.

ASUS ZenFone AR Galaxy S8 Plus LG G6 OnePlus 5 Moto Z Force
AndEBench Pro 13,711 16,064 10,322 17,456 16,455
3DMark IS Unlimited 30,634 35,626 30,346 40,081 28,964
GFXBench 1080p Manhattan Offscreen (fps) 46 55 42 60 49
CF-Bench 30,409 64,441 29,748 78,935 45,803

I only wish I could say the same about the ZenFone’s battery. There’s a 3,300mAh cell tucked inside, which just barely got me through most workdays; I’d pull the phone off the charger between 7 AM and 8 AM, and it would be right on the edge of death by 6 PM. Things got worse when I spent time playing Daydream VR games or using Tango apps for more than a few minutes. Unless you’re very judicious, you’ll have to charge the phone promptly every night. Meanwhile, in Engadget’s battery rundown test, the ZenFone AR looped an HD video with screen brightness set to 50 percent for just over 10 hours before finally dying. That’s well short of the Galaxy S8 and OnePlus 5, and even the HTC U11, a device with a smaller battery.

The competition

ASUS ZenFone AR review: A 'better' Tango phone doesn't mean much

I’m obliged to mention Lenovo’s Phab2 Pro, since it’s literally the only other choice for would-be Tango users, but there’s little reason to take the plunge. Sure, its software is a little tidier, and it has a bigger battery, but otherwise, we’re working with a bigger, slower phone that will never get a Nougat update. At $499, it’s markedly cheaper than the ZenFone AR, but anyone considering splurging on a Tango phone should definitely shell out the extra money.

If you’re not strictly looking for a Tango device, you have plenty of powerful alternatives. As fragile as it can be, I’m a big fan of the HTC U11 — it sports one of the nicest smartphone cameras around, and the company’s Android skin is much, much cleaner. There are plenty of gimmicks on board, but don’t let them distract you: At its core, the U11 is an undeniably great smartphone. Ditto for either of the Galaxy S8s, which often go on sale and pair top-tier performance with some of the most beautiful mobile hardware available today.

Wrap-up

ASUS ZenFone AR review: A 'better' Tango phone doesn't mean much

Lenovo’s Phab2 Pro might have been first, but the ZenFone AR’s superior hardware makes it the best Tango device yet. That’s not really saying much, though: The Tango experience isn’t much better than it was a year ago, and there still isn’t much there to win over people who haven’t already bought into Google’s AR vision. If you’re already tantalized by the potential of augmented reality to change how we see the world, the ZenFone AR is worth looking into. For literally everyone else who just wants a damn good all-around smartphone, there’s little here for you.

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Source URL:http://www.engadget.com/2017/08/19/asus-zenfone-ar-review/

The Morning After: Weekend Edition


Crowdfunding platforms are taking a tough stance against hate speech.
GoFundMe shuts down campaigns for Charlottesville suspect

The Morning After: Weekend Edition

Crowdfunding platforms are taking a no-tolerance approach to campaigns raising money in support of James Fields, the man accused of driving a car into protesters at a white-supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Saturday. GoFundMe has already removed “multiple” campaigns for Fields. Speaking to Reuters, strategic communications director Bobby Whithorne said: “Those campaigns did not raise any money and they were immediately removed.” He added that GoFundMe will delete similar campaigns if more are created. This was only the start of a week of similar moves made by tech companies attempting to combat hate.


The subscription doesn’t include 3D or IMAX screenings, though.
The MoviePass $9.95 ‘unlimited’ deal is one movie a day

Going to the movies isn’t cheap and MoviePass wants to fix that. The company has just announced a $9.95 no contract subscription plan that’ll grant subscribers access to one movie a day in a theater without blackouts. Previously, users were limited to two movies a month for $15, and in Los Angeles and New York that price bumped to $21. AMC, however, wasn’t happy.


Stop trying to make #Bothie happen, Nokia.
With the Nokia 8, its first Android flagship, the company got a lot right

The Morning After: Weekend Edition

Eight months since it started making Android phones in the Nokia name, it’s revealing a big-screened flagship to go up against the Galaxy S8s and iPhones that dominate the smartphone world. As soon as you see the copper-finished Nokia 8, you’ll probably agree it’s a gorgeous device, as ever. It also offers plenty of camera tricks, again, and it’s aimed at young creative types, yet again. But if the plan is to succeed, what is Nokia to do differently this time?


It touched down and lifted off with nobody batting an eyelash.
A drone landed on Britain’s biggest warship and nobody cared

The Pentagon has already approved a policy giving military bases the right to shoot down drones that get too close. A lot of other countries’ governments and militaries, however, are still figuring out how to deal with them as they become more common. A photographer operating under the name Black Isle Images, for instance, landed a drone aboard Britain’s biggest warship, the HMS Queen Elizabeth, and nobody seemed to care.


The automaker dropped two new concept cars at Pebble Beach.
BMW’s redesigned 8 Series is cleaner, more aggressive

The Morning After: Weekend Edition

At the Monterey Car Week, BMW unveiled two new concept vehicles. Both are previews of planned production models of the Series 8 and Z4 Roadster. If the versions on the forecourt are even close to these concepts, there are going to be a lot of very happy movie producers and hedge-fund managers (thanks to the probable high price and outstanding-but-aggressive looks).

But wait, there’s more…

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Source URL:http://www.engadget.com/2017/08/19/the-morning-after-weekend-edition/

Samsung Galaxy Note 8 might be out as soon as September 15th

If you’re ready to take a chance on the latest Note 8 — and your bank account is ready to take the hit — you may want to reserve one instead of waiting for it to come out. Blass said pre-orders will come with either a 256GB microSD card and a wireless charger or Samsung’s cute Gear 360 camera. It’s unclear what extras other countries and territories are getting, but Blass revealed that Samsung will bundle European pre-orders with the DeX dock instead. That’s the same dock the company released with the Galaxy S8 that can turn your phone into a computer.

Back in late July, evleaks also tweeted out full renders of the device in black and gold, which can give you an idea of what the phone and its dual camera could look like. We can also likely expect a smaller battery than the Note 7’s to prevent the same fiery fiasco. You’ll only have a few more days to find out what makes the phone special anyway… and just a day longer to reserve one for yourself.

CORRECTION: the options are as follows

1. 256GB card + wireless charger
2. 360 cam

Sorry for the confusion. https://t.co/Db42n4kVCf

— Evan Blass (@evleaks) August 19, 2017

(The pre-order gift in Europe is a DeX dock.) https://t.co/Db42n43kKH

— Evan Blass (@evleaks) August 18, 2017

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Source URL:http://www.engadget.com/2017/08/19/samsung-galaxy-note-8-release-pre-order/

Mercedes uses art deco inspiration for electric car concept

Of course if you’re the owner of a Mercedes-Maybach vehicle you’re probably going to be getting it valet parked everywhere you go anyways. The automaker’s ultimate luxury brand is known for big powerful cars that cost a pretty penny. The Vision 6–if it ever makes it to market–will no doubt be no different. And like other cars in the line, it’ll be powerful. But instead of gas, it’ll use electrons to push its girth down the road.

The all-wheel drive cabriolet has four compact permanent magnet synchronous electric motors pumping out 750 horsepower. It’ll do zero to 60 in under four seconds and has a top speed governed at 155 miles per hour. The flat battery pack stationed at the base of the vehicle will keep the gigantic–and fast–car on the road for 200 miles according to Mercedes. Plus thanks to DC fast charging, Mercedes says the Vision can be charged to go up to 60 miles in five minutes.

While the exterior of the car is from the time of Al Capone, the interior is futuristic in most regards. The Vision 6 extends the dash design found in the Mercedes EQ SUV. Like that concept car, it’ll intelligently share information with the driver and passenger based on location, time of day and upcoming events. The controls are entirely touchscreen, which is expected. What’s unexpected is the visible pulsing blue wires at the front of the cab that are used to display the energy usage of the car.

There is one area that’s a throwback to the past and that’s the cluster in front of the driver. The gauges are based on wind turbines a common design element used in Art Deco. Surprisingly they fit well in the futuristic interior of the car.

Yet, like most concept cars, it’s unlikely the Vision 6 will ever make it to production in its current form. Still it could be the basis of the design of future cars. So if you’re a fan of huge convertibles and your bank account runneth over, keep an eye on the Maybach lineup for the next few years.

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Source URL:http://www.engadget.com/2017/08/19/mercedes-vision-6-concept-car/

Fighting classic ‘Tekken’ debuts on mobile

In Tekken Mobile, players can collect more than 100 characters, create personal fighting styles and adapt that to specific opponents. The game will feature a Story Mode that sees you create a team of three players who assist Kazuya Mishima against a new enemy called Revenant, who was created for the mobile game. Players will also be able to challenge friends and other users in Dojo mode, and the company will host live events featuring different themed content.

If you pre-register for the game today, you may receive special in-app bonuses. Bandai said in a statement that “as more people pre-register for the game, more rewards and in-game contents will be available for the Global Launch.” The company hasn’t shared when that will be yet, but fighting game fans will likely have a new option to install soon.

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Source URL:http://www.engadget.com/2017/08/18/tekken-mobile-ios-android/

‘Secret World Legends’ expands into disaster-ridden Tokyo

“The Tokyo updates represent the final part of the storyline that was The Secret World,” said Executive Producer Scott Junior in a statement. “But there is much more to come, and we especially want our veteran players to know that as the storyline of The Secret World ends, the storyline of Secret World Legends is about to start. This winter, a brand new story will be revealed.”

Tokyo: Back to the Beginning brings players to Kaidan, Tokyo, also known as Ground Zero since it’s where all of The Secret World events were set in motion. With the expansion come enemies based on Japanese folklore, shady parts of Tokyo to explore and Kaidan’s “horror-haunted avenues.” Players will also come across a lot of quarantined areas that will become accessible with the two additional Tokyo updates. Once all three updates are launched, the game will begin a new story that will bring with it new locations, characters and adventures.

Tokyo: Back to the Beginning is available now.

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Source URL:http://www.engadget.com/2017/08/18/secret-world-legends-expands-tokyo/